Library Data

Collecting and analyzing data about libraries and their future .
Similar perspective, different data
note: this data is for PhD granting universities.
This chart shows something similar to the circulation charts before, in this case we see FTE per 1000 students in academic library.  What’s interesting here is the difference between the upper quartile and the lower.  Notice how different the rate in decline is between the 2 from 1994-2000.  Looking at this data we can see that during that time libraries with high staff per user contracted, while those with a lower one remained relatively the same.  For those looking to defend positions, this would suggest that there is a limit to how you can get your student/staff ratio.
Also interesting is that things remain fairly stable form 2000-2006 (although we are missing some important data points).  As in some of the other charts there is a dip at 2010.  It will be really interesting to see what 2012 data has to tell us: are these dips just a fluctuation, or perhaps a sign of something else? Unlike the circulation data charts, I’m much less inclined to derive much meaning from linear regression.
Data source: Library Statistics Program (National Center for Education Statistics)

Similar perspective, different data


note: this data is for PhD granting universities.

This chart shows something similar to the circulation charts before, in this case we see FTE per 1000 students in academic library.  What’s interesting here is the difference between the upper quartile and the lower.  Notice how different the rate in decline is between the 2 from 1994-2000.  Looking at this data we can see that during that time libraries with high staff per user contracted, while those with a lower one remained relatively the same.  For those looking to defend positions, this would suggest that there is a limit to how you can get your student/staff ratio.

Also interesting is that things remain fairly stable form 2000-2006 (although we are missing some important data points).  As in some of the other charts there is a dip at 2010.  It will be really interesting to see what 2012 data has to tell us: are these dips just a fluctuation, or perhaps a sign of something else? Unlike the circulation data charts, I’m much less inclined to derive much meaning from linear regression.

Data source: Library Statistics Program (National Center for Education Statistics)