Library Data

Collecting and analyzing data about libraries and their future .
Rising cost of serials
For librarians who have spent time working with serials and thinking about scholarly communications, there is nothing here that is too shocking (anymore). However as these issues are starting to get more and more attention in other academic communities (and beyond) there are probably many who are not aware of just how rapidly the cost of serials has been increasing.
A couple points to note:  Academic libraries in the United States spend nearly $2 Billion a year on serials. For reference the RIAA members had $10 Billion in revenue at the end of 2007. The RIAA represents a for-profit industry; academic serials do not exist to make profit, they are the medium of communication between scholars. The research, the writing, the editing and the peer review in the vast majority of cases are all done at zero expense to the publisher. As reward for all the work those publishers extract $2Billion dollars from US universities.
Also note that the rise of e-journals has no observable effect on the rate of increase of serials expenditure, even though it is clear that much of the cost of traditional print journal creation has been removed.
Data source: Library Statistics Program (National Center for Education Statistics)

Rising cost of serials

For librarians who have spent time working with serials and thinking about scholarly communications, there is nothing here that is too shocking (anymore). However as these issues are starting to get more and more attention in other academic communities (and beyond) there are probably many who are not aware of just how rapidly the cost of serials has been increasing.

A couple points to note:  Academic libraries in the United States spend nearly $2 Billion a year on serials. For reference the RIAA members had $10 Billion in revenue at the end of 2007. The RIAA represents a for-profit industry; academic serials do not exist to make profit, they are the medium of communication between scholars. The research, the writing, the editing and the peer review in the vast majority of cases are all done at zero expense to the publisher. As reward for all the work those publishers extract $2Billion dollars from US universities.

Also note that the rise of e-journals has no observable effect on the rate of increase of serials expenditure, even though it is clear that much of the cost of traditional print journal creation has been removed.

Data source: Library Statistics Program (National Center for Education Statistics)